Chocolate from around the World

The UK is a nation of chocolate lovers, with the average Brit scoffing a staggering 17.49lbs a year and the nation’s favourite, Dairy Milk, selling 350 million bars a day.

But how do other countries fare in the chocolate stakes?

Switzerland

The Swiss are renowned for their chocolate, with big brands such as Lindt, Nestle, Milka and Toblerone being loved and exported across the world. Reported to consume 54 per cent of its own produce a year however, it’s no surprise that Switzerland is also the biggest consumer of chocolate in the world.

What makes these chocolates a bit different to the British classics is their higher percentage of cream and milk, often adding honey and almonds, for a classically Swiss, creamy and sweet taste.

South America

In Mexico, and other large areas of the region, chocolate has a history of being consumed not only as a small treat, but incorporated into savory cooking and baking too.

Chocolate with a high cocoa percentage is commonly added to add a rich taste and a bitter, complex flavour to a variety of dishes including chilli, soups and stews.

Unlike the creamy, milk chocolates Europe has become accustomed to, Mexican chocolate usually contains very little milk and is sold in flat round disks, scented with cinnamon and other spices, including chilli.

United States of America

And finally, the big sugar-lovers. The Americans.

Despite the US producing some British favourites, these are commonly reported to not taste quite the same over the pond.

No firm reason has been attached to the differences, but many argue the higher levels of sugar and the added butyric acid significantly alter the taste. The ‘powdery’ texture of American chocolate has also been linked to the reduced amount of cocoa and the absence of vegetable oil.

What’s clear is the eye-wateringly powerful sweet tooth which prevails in the States. Leading the market is Snickers, closely followed in second and third place by sugar-coated M&Ms and Reese’s.

Can you taste the difference in your chocolate adventures around the globe? I’d love to hear what tastes you’ve experienced.